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Certified Fire Doors Can Save Lives

The issue of fire safety is one which is very close to our hearts at Remedial Building Services. The opportunity to do our part, by giving building occupants the best chance of survival, is all the incentive we need really.

Under the banner of fire safety, there are two broad classes: active fire rating systems and a passive fire rating systems. An active fire system is one which seeks to control the blaze and bring it under control and includes systems such as drench systems, fire curtains and gaseous suppression systems. By comparison, passive fire rating systems seek to protect the structure from extreme heat and through this help it to remain structurally sound (standing longer) whilst also preventing the spread of flames through the building. Not only does this allow building residents the ability to get out without walls and the ceiling falling in around them, but allows fire crews the same ability to enter the building and fight the fire more easily.

Certified Fire Doors Can Save Lives

At Remedial, our focus is on passive fire systems encompassing:

  • Thin film intumescents
  • Fire collars
  • Putty pads
  • Mastic sealants
  • Fire batts
  • Fire rated doors

Funnily enough, more often than not, when we are brought in to look at a client’s existing structure and advise on what can be done to make the building compliant and/or safer, we find that they are generally interested in learning about the more ‘technical’ solutions such as spray on intumescents, or fire collars, and not so interested in replacing their fire doors. This is pretty ironic really, as fire doors literally can make a huge difference to the safety of occupants, to the spread of flames and a damaged door will not do what it is intended to do.

Signs that your fire door needs replacing

When we point out to clients that their existing fire doors are no longer compliant, they often look at us aghast or as if we have said something entertaining. The truth is however, a non-compliant fire door should be changed under the BCA to make sure it does the job it exists to do. A faulty door will not prevent the spread of flame and can therefore be a massive liability to occupants and fire teams. Signs your fire door may be faulty include:

  • The door is delaminating
  • Water damage at the bottom of the door
  • Physical damage (such as someone has kicked it in slightly)
  • The door hinges are loose, so the door is no longer air tight
  • The compliance tag shows the door needs a check (found on the inside skin of the door)
  • Someone has previously drilled or nailed into the door
  • You have secured a non-authorised locking apparatus to the door (such as a deadbolt)

Certified fire doors save lives

If your doors are showing any of these signs, you will need to get a certified fire door installed in its place. The importance of a good fire door cannot be emphasised enough. Not only do they prevent the spread of flame – very important for protecting people if they are trapped in a room – but they will not burn (in a cellulosic fire) which gives the fire a better chance to die down .

Failure on the other hand to have a good fire door in place means your residents are at risk of being trapped, or of the flames spreading throughout the building with nothing to hold them back. This puts you and your neighbours at risk.

 

So please, don’t delay, check your fire door today and ensure it is in good working order, air tight and has been certified recently. If it has not been recently checked, please call a certified fire inspector who can ensure the compliance and safety of your door.

This blog was posted in Commercial, Fire upgrades, Strata, Tips

Comments
High Speed Doors
Fire doors not only do prevent the spread of flame but the very important is for protecting people if they are trapped in a room, and this will really make a huge difference.
3/08/2017 11:42:50 AM

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Fire to mankind has meant life itself. But nature is a fickle lover. One minute giving in abundance the next taking away ruthlessly. Fire for food heat and energy - we know all the positives.
Unfortunately as people have come to find out to their great cost fire can be devastating dangerous. We have all seen images of bushfires ranging across vast continents as well as the smallest of islands.
In Southern Africa a great survival technique when caught in a bushfire is to find an Anthill. Climb to the top of the termite mound and watch the flames die at the foot of the structure. The fire approaches the ant hill/termite mound and dies out at the foot of the sand hill. The only problem is the ants are ever so slightly aggravated by the increased heat that surrounds their home and tend to come out to check what's happening. Now if they are normal ants most people can cope even when the little blighters start nipping a bit.
Imagine if what comes out of the anthill are soldier ants or as they are referred to in parts of Southern Africa 'Matabeelee ants'. These ants are an inch long and have pincers that cut straight through to the bone. Personally I might consider making a dash through the fire to avoid these bad boys!
Fire barriers are common place and more and more buildings are having fire doors installed. In new build properties whether they are commercial or domestic structures, fire doors are quickly becoming standard issue. Traditionally especially treated wooden fire doors where the answer. The thickness of the door is what makes it so secure because each inch of thickness increases the fire barrier between you and the raging inferno in the other room.
However with the environment as hot a topic as fire itself, wood and carbon footprint wooden fire doors create really is point of contention. So the development of double glazed PVCu fire doors is a real advancement. Fire doors with their chemical composition and fire retardant glass is lighter than wood, easier to install and have less of an impact on the environment. I like your post. I will share your blog to my friend. <a href="http://www.advancedfiredoors.com.au">Fire door installation</a>
20/06/2017 6:19:50 AM

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